gdb.info: Commands For Killing

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Killing And Yanking

`kill-line (C-k)'
     Kill the text from point to the end of the line.
`backward-kill-line (C-x Rubout)'
     Kill backward to the beginning of the line.
`unix-line-discard (C-u)'
     Kill backward from the cursor to the beginning of the current line.
`kill-whole-line ()'
     Kill all characters on the current line, no matter where point is.
     By default, this is unbound.
`kill-word (M-d)'
     Kill from point to the end of the current word, or if between
     words, to the end of the next word.  Word boundaries are the same
     as `forward-word'.
`backward-kill-word (M-<DEL>)'
     Kill the word behind point.  Word boundaries are the same as
     `backward-word'.
`unix-word-rubout (C-w)'
     Kill the word behind point, using white space as a word boundary.
     The killed text is saved on the kill-ring.
`delete-horizontal-space ()'
     Delete all spaces and tabs around point.  By default, this is
     unbound.
`kill-region ()'
     Kill the text in the current region.  By default, this command is
     unbound.
`copy-region-as-kill ()'
     Copy the text in the region to the kill buffer, so it can be yanked
     right away.  By default, this command is unbound.
`copy-backward-word ()'
     Copy the word before point to the kill buffer.  The word
     boundaries are the same as `backward-word'.  By default, this
     command is unbound.
`copy-forward-word ()'
     Copy the word following point to the kill buffer.  The word
     boundaries are the same as `forward-word'.  By default, this
     command is unbound.
`yank (C-y)'
     Yank the top of the kill ring into the buffer at point.
`yank-pop (M-y)'
     Rotate the kill-ring, and yank the new top.  You can only do this
     if the prior command is `yank' or `yank-pop'.